13 February 2011

A Glorious Revolution

It’s been interesting to compare reactions to events in Egypt.  My US friends, at least those who care about things international, have been cheering the Egyptian protesters, hoping that Mubarak would resign.  When we watch the news from Uzbekistan, there’s no mention at all of Egypt.  And people aren’t talking much about Egypt in Kyrgyzstan.  I’m planning on asking the students on Tuesday about their reaction to it, but from the little I’ve gathered so far, there certainly isn’t cheering going on here.  It’s hard to cheer for that kind of government change when it’s happened in your country, and basically resulted in job losses, increased cost of living, and, especially, horrific ethnic violence. 

Sometimes I wish someone would write a well-researched and well-written book on the results of the American Revolution on everyday life in America, especially during and right after the Revolution.  It seems that we tend to glorify revolution and gloss over the hard parts.  And we had plenty of hard parts, even if we conveniently forget them.

5 comments:

  1. This is why I liked reading _My Brother Sam Is Dead_ to my boys even though most of the book was kind of boring.

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  2. Yes, it would definitely be interesting to read a book like that. Are you sure it hasn't been written yet?

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  3. It probably has been written. I just need to find it.

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  4. Well let me know when you find it! Although I'm guessing it may be easier to find turmeric... ;)

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  5. Thoughtful post, Amira. We do, especially in America, tend to glorify our revolution without consideration to the difficult parts. That, and we tend to believe our method of doing things will work for everyone/everywhere else.

    It's interesting to note that not everyone is as excited by this change as people in the US (or Egypt) seem to be.

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