11 January 2007

Reading Across Borders

I've never done any of the reading challenges floating around, but Kate's Reading Across Borders may have hooked me. SFP has her list up, and there are lots of other lists in the comments at Kate's blog (one of the best is an entire blog devoted to reading across the world and I didn't know about Words Without Borders). I've been thinking about reading more literature and this may be the way to go. Now technically I shouldn't put any books from Central Asia on my list, but that seems a bit excessive to me so I'll break that rule. This list (in progress) is mostly limited to books I can get at the local library. And I'd love to get more suggestions, of course, especially since this list is pretty heavy on Asia. (Links to reviews are being added as I finish each book.)

The Railway by Hamid Ismailov
Ancestor Stones by Aminatta Forna
My Name is Red and Snow by Orhan Pamuk
The Day Lasts More Than 100 Years by Chingiz Aitmatov
Suite Fran├žaise by Irene Nemirovsky
A Suitable Boy by Vikram Seth
A House for Mr. Biswas by V.S. Naipaul
Midnight's Children by Salman Rushdie
Things Fall Apart by Chinua Achebe
Nervous Conditions by Tsitsi Dangarembga

6 comments:

Anna said...

Thanks, Amira -- I'm in. And I think I'm going to try making a list entirely of YA novels. Should be interesting.

mami said...

I think you might like The Long Walk by Slavomir Rawicz. It was dictated decades ago to a journalist in London--maybe you've already read it? It's the true story of 7 men who escape the gulag and walk from Siberia to India.

Amira said...

Mami, I started it a couple of months ago but didn't get it done. It's still on my list to check out again at the library because I still want to read it.

I'll be interested to hear what you read, Anna.

acquisitionist said...

Very nice list. I look forward to your reviews.

ambar said...

I'll join your challenge. Maybe we can do an online book club or something.

Nyura said...

I've finished my first qualifying read -- Over a Thousand Hills I Walk With You, a YA novel by Hanna Jansen, translated from German. It's the ficitonalized story of Jansen's Rwandan daughter Jeanne, orphaned at 8 when the rest of her birthfamily was massacred in the 1994 Rwandan genocide rampage. Stark, but not as horrific as an adult novel or NF. Thanks to the challenge for getting it off the waiting list.