01 March 2006

Wrong Number

I don't know what it is, but I get a lot of wrong numbers. On Monday, for example, the phone rang 4 times. 4 wrong numbers. I'd just ignore it, but the boys can't stand to let the phone ring. I've had people calling to buy our apartment, to buy drugs, to ask if we're various kinds of stores, and all sorts of things. An answering machine would be a nice solution, but I honestly don't think people would know what to do if one answered the phone.

So I leave the phone line connected to the computer most of the day. Much quieter.

7 comments:

  1. Okay, how do you know it's a wrong number until you pick it up? Is it that you don't give it out, and do not expect calls? And by the way, do they have 411 over there? Caller ID?

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  2. no fair! Chronicler took all my questions!

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  3. I lived in Karakol for ten months in 2002 and 2003 and I discovered that the answering machine was at the top of my list with the watch as the items I would most like to see in use in Kyrgyzstan. Your blog has made me home sick and my husband and I have decided to return for six weeks this summer. It is also encouraging to know that foreigners can in fact adopt from Kyrgyzstan as my husband and I would like to in about three or four years. I had heard that only nationals were allowed to adopt and had been greatly disapointed. Thank you for writing!

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  4. Jamie, thanks for stopping by! We're hoping that we can spend a few months in Karakol next year if we're able to stay in Kyrgyzstan. I think it will be a very different experience than living in Bishkek. Were you married when you lived there? Are there many apartments for expat families? There are lots of questions I'll have about Karakol if we go there.

    chronicler and s'mee (what are sisters for but to swipe the good questions?), I don't know it's a wrong number till I pick it up. Usually it's someone jabbering away in Russia and won't believe me that I don't understand them. I have trouble talking on the phone in English, much less trying to communicate in Russian.

    I doubt there is a phone company that offers caller ID or anything else. We have to pay the phone company too when we're connected to the internet.

    Actually, I'm just grateful to have a phone that usually works and that allows us to use the internet. A cell phone would be a good option to weed out the bad calls. No one accidently calls a cell phone here.

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  5. Karakol is MUCH different then Bishkek, but I absolutely adore it. In the summer it is nearly a ghost town as it is only busy when the universities are in session. When we came to the city we did not have anything arranged in advance but managed to have two flats in the same building by nightfall for a decent rate. I was single when I lived there but had a roomate and three guys that came with us stayed in the apartment across the hall so there were five of us total and we all loved it. If you go there you will have to check out the restaurant Kench and the cute little log cabin restaurant (I've forgotten it's name, maybe Kalinka). Many things that you can get in Bishkek are nowhere to be found in Karakol, so be sure to bring any niceties with you in advance. I actually experience severe culture shock when coming back even to Bishkek after not having seen it for three months and I think that was by far the strangest experience I have ever had.

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  6. That's what I though it would be like. A place that makes Bishkek seem marvelous. I haven't been out there yet, but my husband has twice. It really sounds like a lovely town and we'd like to live there. Thanks so much for your help. I enjoyed looking at your website.

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  7. Let me know before you head out there:)

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