04 February 2006




I never could really get a definite name for these, but I see them in almost everyone's homes, either for cushions on the floor or covering the couches. They are always brightly colored and beautiful.

8 comments:

  1. They look like korpuchas to me.

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  2. They never used that word. They were using the same word another woman used for quilt (tuyuk, or something like it?). I need to ask around more.

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  3. Well, they look much fancier than most ko'rpuchas I saw in Uzbekistan. But, in a slight amendment to my first comment, they most definitely are ko'rpuchas. Well, that's definitely the word for them in Uzbek, anyway.

    I'd hazard a guess that the Uzbek word isn't a genuine Turkic word though. A few things about it make it look like a borrowed term, so it's quite possible Kyrgyz would have an entirely different word.

    And because I think too much about these things, I'll probably ask my Uzbek instructor whether or not it's a loan word. And then I'll ask a Kyrgyz professor I have what word the Kyrgyz use. Otherwise it'll drive me mad.

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  4. I'll be curious to find out what the right word is. I asked several people and never got one consistent answer.

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  5. I haven't asked the Kyrgyz prof yet, but if ko'rpucha's a borrowed word in Uzbek, it's not from Arabic (because it has a "p" in it) and it's not from Farsi or Tajik.

    I don't know why this is bothering me so much, but I must know!

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  6. I think the word you heard might have been "tushuk." (I'm pretty sure she said tushuk.) The Kyrgyz professor said that ko'rpacha is right. But, whenever I said "ko'rpacha," she said "ko'rpa," which happens to be the word for quilt in Uzbek. +cha is just diminutive. She told me that while tushuk means something else, many people do use it interchangeably. She's from near the Uzbek border, so tushuk might be used far more in Bishkek than where she's from.

    So, "ko'rphacha," "ko'rpa," and "tushuk" all appear to be right.

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  7. Thanks for tracking that down Nathan.

    Have you studied Arabic? I ask since you mention that ko'rpa can't be from Arabic. If so, has it helped much with Turkic languages? I've noticed many borrowings in my limited experience with Kyrgyz and Uzbek, but there are enough differences that it doesn't seem to be a huge benefit.

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  8. I haven't studied any Arabic at all. Uzbek, much moreso than Kyrgyz I think, has plenty of vocabulary from Arabic. There's more from Persian though. There once was a time that I could listen to Persian and get a bit of the gist of the conversation based just off vocab I recognized.

    So, basically, it'll help you with some vocab, but not one bit with the fun stuff like agglutination and the weird verb tenses.

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